School board reverses ban on "Invisible Man"

September 30, 2013
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Ralph Ellison's "Invisible Man" again available to students in one North Carolina County.

Ralph Ellison’s “Invisible Man” again available to students in one North Carolina County.

Earlier this month, TeenJury reported on how the Randolph County Board of Education in North Carolina voted to ban Ralph Ellison’s “Invisible Man” from school libraries.  However, last week, after hundreds of complaints, the board held a special meeting and reversed itself, voting 6-1 to lift the ban.  Originally, the board voted 5-2 to institute the ban.  “I felt like I came to a conclusion too quickly,” said board member Matthew Lambeth.  Evan Smith Rakoff, a writer and editor, who grew up in Randolph County, reacted by working to get the publisher to donate free copies to a local bookstore.  “I think banning any book is abhorrent, but banning a book that’s so undeniably great is incredibly upsetting,” Rakoff said.  Luckily, this classic work will again be available to all students.

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